Lack of Exercise Fails to Counter Cardio Risks from Sugary Drinks

Despite the protective effect of the recommended 150 minutes of weekly physical activity against cardiovascular disease, it falls short in offsetting the negative impact of sugar-sweetened beverages.

  •  Regular physical activity does not sufficiently counteract the negative impact of consuming sugary beverages on cardiovascular health.
  • Even moderate consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks, as low as twice a week, is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk.
  •  Urgent interventions are needed to reduce sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and promote healthier alternatives like water to mitigate cardiovascular risks effectively.

A new study underscores the insufficiency of regular physical activity in mitigating the cardiovascular risks associated with sugar-sweetened beverage consumption. Despite the protective effects of recommended exercise levels, sugar-laden drinks remain a significant factor contributing to cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of global mortality.

Conducted over a span of approximately 30 years and involving around 100,000 adults, the research revealed that even moderate consumption of sugary beverages, as low as twice a week, significantly increased the risk of cardiovascular disease. Daily consumption exacerbated this risk further, highlighting the urgent need for public health interventions to address the pervasive availability of these drinks in the food environment.

While diet drinks offer a potential alternative by reducing sugar intake, the optimal choice for cardiovascular health remains water. The study emphasizes the importance of public health initiatives aimed at reducing sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and promoting adequate physical activity levels to mitigate cardiovascular disease risk effectively.